Using the Crossref REST API. Part 3 (with SHARE)

As a follow-up to our blog posts on the Crossref REST API we talked to SHARE about the work they’re doing, and how they’re employing the Crossref metadata as a piece of the puzzle.  Cynthia Hudson-Vitale from SHARE explains in more detail…

Continue reading “Using the Crossref REST API. Part 3 (with SHARE)”

Call for participation: Membership & Fees Committee

Crossref was founded to enable collaboration between publishers.  As our membership has grown and diversified over recent years, it’s becoming even more vital that we take input from a representative cross-section of the membership. This is especially important when considering how fees and policies will affect our diverse members in different ways.

About the M&F Committee

The Membership & Fees Committee (M&F Committee) was established in 2001 and plays an important role in Crossref’s governance.  Made up of 10-12 organizations of both board members and regular members, the group makes recommendations to the board about fees and policies for all of our services. They regularly review existing fees to discuss if any changes are needed. They also review new services while they are being developed, to assess if fees should be charged and if so, what those fees should be. For example, the committee recently made recommendations to the board about the fees for a new service called Event Data that we’ll launch soon, and the deposit fees for preprints – our newest content type.  In addition, the board can also ask the committee to address specific issues about policies and services. Increasingly, the committee works with the outreach team to include research and survey insights.

About committee participation

The M&F Committee meets via one-hour conference calls about six times a year, although this can vary depending on what issues the committee is considering. Often proposals are developed by staff and then reviewed and discussed by the committee – so there is reading to do in preparation for the calls.Join a Crossref committee

This is very important work and in order to ensure that the committee is broadly representative of Crossref’s diverse membership we are seeking expressions of interest from members who would like to serve on the M&F Committee for 2017. Appointments are for one year and members can serve multiple terms.

About you

In view of our commitment to be representative of the membership we are refreshing the committee and want to have engaged and interested people from a diverse set of members join.

If you are interested in joining the committee and helping Crossref fulfil its mission please email feedback@crossref.org with your name, title, organization and a short statement about why you want to serve on the committee by December 19th, 2016.      

Scott Delman, Director of Group Publishing, ACM is the current Chair of the committee and will review the expressions of interest with me, Ed Pentz, Executive Director, to form the committee.

Thanks for your interest.

A look back at LIVE16

Crossref LIVE16 opened with a Mashup Day on 1st November 2016 in London. Attendees from the scholarly communications world met to chat with Crossref team members in an open house atmosphere. The Crossref team put their latest projects on display and were met with questions, comments, and ideas from members and other metadata folks. Here’s what it looked like — you may recognize a few familiar faces. 

Crossref LIVE16 in London

crossref-day1-mashupdaysign

LIVE16 continued with the Conference Day on 2nd November, a plenary session with invited speakers and presentations by the Crossref team. Here are the presentations, in chronological order.

Dario Taraborelli speaks on “Wikipedia’s role in the dissemination of scholarship” 

Ian Calvert speaks on: “You don’t have metadata (and how to befriend a data scientist)” 

Ed Pentz speaks on “Crossref’s outlook & key priorities” 

Ginny Hendricks speaks on “A vision for membership”

Geoffrey Bilder speaks on “The case of the missing leg” 

Lisa Hart Martin speaks on “The meaning of governance”

Jennifer Lin speaks on “New territories in the Scholarly Research Map”

 

Chuck Koscher speaks on “Relationships and other notable things” 

Carly Strasser speaks on “Funders and Publishers as Agents of Change” 

April Hathcock speaks on “Opening Up the Margins”

 

Your survey feedback

We’re serious about making Crossref LIVE a useful and welcoming annual event for the Crossref membership as well as members of the wider scholarly communications community. That’s why we appreciate responses from the attendees who answered our survey. Here’s what we have learned from your feedback:

Content

  • You want speakers to tell you something new, even if you don’t agree with their points of view
  • Your favorite speakers were those who inspired you
  • You prefer an unscripted presentation style that makes complex topics accessible to all
  • You’re not as interested in the mechanics of Crossref’s annual election as we are

Format

  • You enjoyed the diversity of presenters and would like even more external speakers
  • You want more opportunity to ask us technical questions on the Mashup Day  
  • You want to see panel discussions in addition to individual presentations on the Conference Day
  • Those who attended the Conference Day only wished they had also attended the Mashup Day

Atmosphere

  • You liked the casual atmosphere but wanted more seating and more dessert.  So noted!

LIVE17 will be held next November 14-15 in Asia. Until then, we hope you’ll have the chance to see us at the regional Crossref LIVE events we are planning around the world throughout the year. Our next local event is Crossref LIVE in Brazil, held 13 December in Campinas and 16 December in Sao Paulo. 

URLs and DOIs: a complicated relationship

As the linking hub for scholarly content, it’s our job to tame URLs and put in their place something better. Why? Most URLs suffer from link rot and can be created, deleted or changed at any time. And that’s a problem if you’re trying to cite them.

Continue reading “URLs and DOIs: a complicated relationship”

Preprints are go at Crossref!

As content evolves, connections persist and new links are added
As content evolves, connections persist and new links are added

We’re excited to say that we’ve finished the work on our infrastructure to allow members to register preprints. Want to know why we’re doing this? Jennifer Lin explains the rationale in detail in an earlier post, but in short we want to help make sure that:

  • links to these publications persist over time
  • they are connected to the full history of the shared research results
  • the citation record is clear and up-to-date

Doing so will help fully integrate preprint publications into the formal scholarly record.

Continue reading “Preprints are go at Crossref!”

The Organization Identifier Project: a way forward

The scholarly communications sector has built and adopted a series of open identifier and metadata infrastructure systems to great success.  Content identifiers (through Crossref and DataCite) and contributor identifiers (through ORCID) have become foundational infrastructure to the industry.  The OI Project, organization identifierBut there still seems to be one piece of the infrastructure that is missing.  There is as yet no open, stakeholder-governed infrastructure for organization identifiers and associated metadata.

In order to understand this gap, Crossref, DataCite and ORCID have been collaborating to:

  • Explore the current landscape of organizational identifiers;
  • Collect the use-cases that would benefit our respective stakeholders in scholarly communications industry;
  • Identify those use-cases that can be more feasibly addressed in the near term; and
  • Explore how the three organizations can collaborate (with each other and with others) to practically address this key missing piece of scholarly infrastructure.

The result of this work is in three related papers being released by Crossref, DataCite and ORCID for community review and feedback. The three papers are:

  • Organization Identifier Project: A Way Forward (PDFGDoc)
  • Organization Identifier Provider Landscape (PDF; GDoc)
  • Technical Considerations for an Organization Identifier Registry (PDF; GDoc)

We invite the community to comment on these papers both via email (oi-project@orcid.org) and at PIDapalooza on November 9th and 10th and at Crossref LIVE16 on November 1st and 2nd. To move The OI Project forward, we will be forming a Community Working Group with the goal of holding an initial meeting before the end of 2016. The Working Group’s main charge is to develop a plan to launch and sustain an open, independent, non-profit organization identifier registry to facilitate the disambiguation of researcher affiliations.

Crossref Use Cases

Crossref has also been discussing the needs of its members over the last year and there is value in focusing on the affiliation name ambiguity problem with research outputs and contributors. In terms of the metadata that Crossref collects, something that is missing has been affiliations for the authors of publications. Over the last couple of years, Crossref has been expanding what it collects – for example, funding and licensing data and ORCID iDs – and this enables a fuller picture of what we are calling the “article nexus”. In order to continue to fill out the metadata we collect – and for our publisher members to use in their own systems and publications – we need an organization identifier.

Another use case for Crossref is identifying funders as part of collecting funder data to enable connecting funding sources with the published scholarly literature. In order to enable the reliable identification of funders in the Crossref system we created the Open Funder Registry that now has over 13,000 funders available as Open Data under a CC0 waiver. While this has been very successful, it is a very narrowly focused registry and is not suitable for a broad, community-run organization identifier registry that addresses the affiliation use case.  In future, our goal will be to merge the Open Funder Registry into the identifier registry that the Organization Identifier Working Group will work on.

By working collaboratively we can define a pragmatic and cost-effective service that will meet a fundamental need of all scholarly communication stakeholders.

Geoffrey Bilder will be focusing his talk at Crossref LIVE16 this week on this initiative, dubbed The OI Project. The talk is scheduled for 2pm UK time and will be live streamed along with the rest of that day’s program.

Smart alone; brilliant together. Community reigns at Crossref LIVE16

A bit different from our traditional meetings, Crossref LIVE16 next week is the first of a totally new annual event for the scholarly communications community.  Our theme is Smart alone; brilliant together.  We have a broad program of both informal and plenary talks across two days. There will be stations to visit, conversation starters, and entertainment, that highlight what our community can achieve if it works together.

Check out the final program.

We’re now opening the doors to all parties—our 5,000+ publisher members of all shapes and sizes—as well as the technology providers, funders, libraries, and researchers that we work with.  Our aim is to gather the ‘metadata-curious’ and have more opportunities to talk face-to-face to share ideas and information, see live demos, and get to know one another.

Mashup Day – Tuesday 1st November 12-5pm.  An ‘open house’ vibe, we’ll have several stations to visit each Crossref team, a LIVE Lounge, good food, and guest areas run by our friends at DataCite, ORCID, and Turnitin.  We’ll have some special programming too, on-the-hour lightning talks, including a wild talk at 2pm from a primatologist who speaks baboon!

Conference Day – Wednesday 2nd November 9am-5pm.  There is more of a formal plenary agenda this day, with keynote speakers from across the scholarly communications landscape.  Our primary goal is to share Crossref strategy and plans, alongside thought-provoking perspectives from our guest speakers.  We’ll hear from many corners of our community including:

  • Funder program officer, Carly Strasser (Moore Foundation) on “Publishers and funders as agents of change“,
  • Data scientist, Ian Calvert (Digital Science) on “You don’t have metadata“,
  • Open knowledge advocate, Dario Taraborelli (The Wikimedia Foundation) on “Citations for the sum of all human knowledge“, and
  • Scholarly communications librarian, April Hathcock (New York University) on “Opening up the margins“.

For our part, we will set out Crossref’s “strategy and key priorities” (Ed Pentz), “A vision for membership” (me, Ginny Hendricks), “The meaning of governance” (Lisa Hart Martin), “The case of the missing leg” (Geoffrey Bilder),”New territories in the scholarly research map” (Jennifer Lin), and “Relationships and other notable things” (Chuck Koscher).  

We will also set aside thirty minutes for the important Crossref annual business meeting, when we will announce the results of the membership’s vote, and welcome new board members.

I can’t wait to welcome you all.

Have you voted?

If you’re a voting member of Crossref you’ll have cast your vote already I hope! I’m so happy to see that people have voted in record numbers although it’s under 7% of our eligible members which is not high… more on member participation next week.

Take this 4 minute survey if you’re a Crossref member who registers book content

This one is for the book publishers.

If you are a Crossref member and register online or digital books with us, we would like to know how you handle reference lists. Do you include DOIs that link out to other books and articles in your reference lists?

Please take our 4-minute survey: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3008801/f46898b8751c
book-lovers-candle

To thank you for taking the time to respond, we’ll enter you in a drawing to receive this book lovers’ “Bookworm” candle with apple fragrance, a delightful autumn accompaniment to your favorite digital edition.

Your survey response will help us plan future tools for book publishers, improve our best practice guide for depositing book references, and keep us informed about current developments in digital book publishing.

Please take a few minutes to respond now, or forward to a colleague who can respond by Thursday, 9 November.

Thank you in advance for your help!